Book Cover Meme

Jennifer posted a few days ago on the Book Cover Meme, and I thought I’d play along. The idea is to go to Amazon.com’s advanced search, search on your first name in a book title, and pick the most interesting book cover that’s in the search results. Since I have a common, biblical, first name,…

“Inheritance of Loss” by Kiran Desai

This aptly-titled novel is primarily a dual story, one about Jemubhai, a retired judge and his granddaughter Sai, orphaned, convent-schooled, and now living with her grandfather in a decrepit old mansion, the other about the judge’s cook (who remains nameless until the very last page) and his son Biju, an illegal immigrant working in New…

“Living Your Yoga” by Judith Lasater

This book provides a gentle introduction to yogic philosophy, and the non-pose aspects of yoga (the series of poses known commonly as “yoga” are but one of the eight limbs of yoga).  Lasater, a yoga instructor in San Francisco, divides the book into three parts. Part one deals with the internal (spritual seeking, discipline, letting…

“Mind of the Raven” by Bernd Heinrich

“Mind of the Raven: Investigations and Adventures with Wolf-Birds” is very high on my list of the best nature-writing I’ve read to date. Heinrich, who has written several book about ravens, here examines myriad aspects of their complex lives, from play behavior, mating, following (or leading) predators. From numerous field studies, as well as controlled…

“Food Politics” by Marion Nestle

This 2003 James Beard Foundation award winner is a weighty examination of the role politics has played (and is playing) in the evolution of our food supply and its regulation (or lack thereof). Nestle (no relation to the same-named company), a nutritionist, exhaustively examines a number of aspects of food policy: dietary advice (the Food…

“1776” by David McCullough

I just finished this, the second of McCullough’s that I’ve read (the other being his also-excellent “John Adams”), and am now thinking that McCullough is one of the best history writers I’ve read. Like “Adams,” “1776” is engagingly-written, and very approachable. The title should give you a good clue as to the time period covered,…